THE BOOTSTRAP PARADOX

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The Bootstrap Paradox is a paradox of time travel that questions how something that is taken from the future and placed in the past could ever come into being in the first place. It’s a common trope used by science fiction writers and has inspired plotlines in everything fromDoctor Who to the Bill and Ted movies, but one of the most memorable and straightforward examples—by Professor David Toomey of the University of Massachusetts and used in his book The New Time Travellers—involves an author and his manuscript.

Imagine that a time traveller buys a copy of Hamlet from a bookstore, travels back in time to Elizabethan London, and hands the book to Shakespeare, who then copies it out and claims it as his own work. Over the centuries that follow, Hamlet is reprinted and reproduced countless times until finally a copy of it ends up back in the same original bookstore, where the time traveller finds it, buys it, and takes it back to Shakespeare. Who, then, wrote Hamlet?

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John123 Expert Asked on 30th July 2015 in Unsolved Puzzles.
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    Shakesphere, as the traveller when bought the book from bookstore, it’s already written by shakesphere. As per me though time traveller went to back Elizabethan era and gave the book to shakesphere before he started to pen it down, but the story is already in his mind

    Pmula Starter Answered on 26th April 2020.
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